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The argument for plate tectonics (1 of 6)

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Powerful scientific ideas generate many different expectations, not just one. As an example, let's return to the idea that the continents as we know them today were once joined together into a supercontinent and have been moving apart ever since. This idea generates many different expectations; we would expect to find corresponding fossils on now distant continents.

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This image is part of a series:

The argument for plate tectonics (2 of 6)
We would expect to find that the continents are shaped in ways that could have once fit together.

The argument for plate tectonics (3 of 6)
We would expect to find that rock layers and geological features on now distant continents match up where they were once joined.

The argument for plate tectonics (4 of 6)
We would expect to find that the evolutionary relationships among non-marine species reflect the ancient supercontinental break up.

The argument for plate tectonics (5 of 6)
We would expect to find direct evidence of ongoing tectonic movement through sensitive satellite measurements.

The argument for plate tectonics (6 of 6)
We would expect to find a plausible mechanism by which the continents could have moved.

 


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